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Karø Goldt
Inter View

U1 Inter View B1500Px

The photographs by German artist Karø Goldt, who was born in 1967, do not seek to tell stories. Because her shots are not staged, one could describe them as documentary-style in the broadest sense. However, these are no systematically or dramatically ordered reworkings of specific themes, but instead apparently random snapshots of places, objects, city views, museum architecture or landscapes which have been torn out of their contexts.

€25.00

  • Editor

    Karø Goldt

  • Texts

    Maren Lübbke-Tidow, Thomas Macho

  • Design

    Ina Munzinger in collaboration with Karø Goldt

  • Language

    German/English

  • Details

    Paperback, 28 x 21 cm, 180 pages, 141 ills. in color

  • ISBN

    978-3-903228-82-5

About the product

The photographs by German artist Karø Goldt, who was born in 1967, do not seek to tell stories. Because her shots are not staged, one could describe them as documentary-style in the broadest sense. However, these are no systematically or dramatically ordered reworkings of specific themes, but instead apparently random snapshots of places, objects, city views, museum architecture or landscapes which have been torn out of their contexts.

In this book the individual photographs were each allocated details from the bibliography of “The Turning Point: Science, Society, and the Rising Culture” written by Fritjof Capra and published in 1982, in alphabetical order of the book titels from A to O. The literature titles serve as titles for the works and at the same time function as a system for arranging the shots. Although Capra’s book has practically been forgotten today, during the 1980s it was one of the most influential texts of the New Age movement because of its prediction of a future “turning point.” In today’s complex times, however, these sorts of optimistic predictions are viewed with a certain degree of skepticism. The inherent optimism contrasts with the bleakness of Goldt’s photographs, which gives rise to an interplay between utopias and dystopias.