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Tina Lechner
Susan told me

Tina Lechner Susan

Working with analog photography Tina Lechner uses her camera as an instrument to explore identity, depicting subjectivity, opening the gaze to an apocalyptic vision of later (post-) modernity. While the photos capture a strong surface - gauging the whole range of possibility of black and white photography - the human body is coated in self-produced requisites, decidedly unsettling, suggesting some sort of strange, science fiction-esque rebirth, undermining the cultural construction of femininity.

€38.00

  • EDITOR

    Tina Lechner

  • TEXTS

    Kathy Battista, Sven Beckstette, Marlies Wirth

  • DESIGN

    PEACH, Vienna; Tina Lechner

  • LANGUAGE

    English

  • DETAILS

    Hardcover, 33 x 28 cm, 204 pages, 124 ills. in color and b/w

  • ISBN

    978-3-903269-52-1

About the product

Working with analog photography Tina Lechner uses her camera as an instrument to explore identity, depicting subjectivity, opening the gaze to an apocalyptic vision of later (post-) modernity. While the photos capture a strong surface - gauging the whole range of possibility of black and white photography - the human body is coated in self-produced requisites, decidedly unsettling, suggesting some sort of strange, science fiction-esque rebirth, undermining the cultural construction of femininity. It borrows from the conviction that humankind has lost control over its own creatures in such that even though the female body is always the nucleus of her images, it becomes a retro-futuristic sculpture combining elements of a magical and cyborg identity, blurring the line between human and inanima.

Lechner’s work is a timeless amalgamation of styles, techniques and cultural references that make her work so original, so striking. Tina Lechner brings together the difficulty of dual discourses of photography as an object and image, cutting out the “either-or” and embracing the notion of Ernst Gombrich‘s “eitherand”. Her achronic visual language refers back to the early 1920/30s but becomes unique through her modification of that exact visual codification.